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1000 Black Lines

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Categorizing Books

As a class assignment, I am reading Peter Rubie’s Telling the Story. On page 19, the book presents this definition of publishing genres: "The development of genres came about as a marketing necessity. 'Category' and 'genre' are marketing terms... Their purpose is basically to help you more easily find what it is you're looking for." Telling the Story then goes on to list seven narrative nonfiction categories: Adventure, Travel Books, Biography, History, Military, Memoir and True Crimes. My book idea overlaps a couple of those categories. Keep in mind that narrative, by it's nature, can break genre barriers. Take for instance Black Hawk Down,--adventure, history and military.

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